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Prana Yoga Therapy

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© 2013 by Prana Yoga Therapy​

Our Approach

Eastern medicine recognizes that the state of internal physiological balance is essential and is dependent on the interplay of opposing forces. A.G. Mohan writes: “To maintain health, the functioning of any body part or system must fall within a certain range of intensity.”

In the yoga tradition, we usually take the “zoom out” approach and try to see how a specific issue fits into a pattern of physiological imbalance throughout the entire system. Instead of dividing the organs into systems based on their function, the yoga tradition focuses on the movement of nourishment throughout the system. It recognizes that for the body to be alive and healthy you need to take nourishment in (in the form of food, water or experiences), then you need to process it somehow, distribute and absorb the nutrients, eliminate waste, and as a result heal, grow and evolve. Multiple organ systems are involved in each aspect of this process. If something begins to malfunction, the first question you ask is not which organ system is affected (circulatory, digestive, immune, respiratory, etc.), but which direction of movement are you having trouble with (taking stuff in, processing it, distributing it, eliminating it or growing from it).

The underlying root of most negative behavior is a broken belief. Most often formed as a means of self-preservation at a time when it was needed but has remained lurking in the unconscious long past the event which warranted its creation. It often lays dormant until a set of events triggers it to reemerge.

 

When integrated with conventional therapies, Yoga and mindfulness offer a holistic approach to reprogramming beliefs, breaking addictive behaviors, negative emotions, and the cycle of stress by creating a sense of self-awareness, self-control, and self-realization.

 

Through breathing practices and specific movement techniques, we have the ability to regulate our own physiology including some of the so-called involuntary functions of the body. We pair this with svadyaya (self study), abhyanga (diligent practice) and vairagya (dispassion), leading you into the fire of self-transformation,  which allows you to regain control of the mind and behaviors. 

Who we are

Amber Johnson is a Certified Yoga Teacher with over 900 hours of training. She received training in Psychotherapeutic yoga with Shanon Buffington RYS, where she has also completed advanced yoga training including studies in Ayurveda. She has studied ParaYoga under Rod Stryker, Yoga Nidra with Tracee Stanley, and Trauma Center Trauma-Sensitive Yoga with David Emerson.  She draws from her own experience of healing childhood trauma, finding freedom from years of substance abuse, self-defeating behaviors and beliefs to guide her students towards the door of awakening their true nature. The focus of Amber’s teaching is empowerment, self-mastery, and healing.
 

Fun Fact: Amber hopes to open a sloth sanctuary where she will care for rescue sloths.

Stacy Kroeger is a 500 hour certified teacher having completed training with The Kula Initiative (200 RYS), Shanon Buffington (200 RYS plus Advanced Training in Yoga Sutra, Yoga & Ayurveda, Prana and Dharma & Desire), James Fox (Prison Yoga Project) and Shana Meyerson (Mini Yogis), as well as continuing education with Rod Stryker (Parayoga). The focus of Stacy’s teaching, for both teens and adults, is changing behaviors and beliefs through yoga postures, meditation and pranayama (breathing techniques). She brings the benefit of yoga and mindfulness to children as young as 2 years old in her weekly kids’ class at The Keller Library. Stacy is also an Advanced Practitioner of TFT, Callahan Techniques - Thought Field Therapy. TFT can help with stress, anxiety, trauma, phobias, toxins, addictions, grief and more making it an excellent addition to yoga for helping her clients heal and move on to a life love and joy.

Fun Fact: While attending college at UTA, Stacy volunteered as a Dallas Zoo Docent and can answer the question, "What animal is the only animal to be born with horns?" Hint: